Gaming

World’s Most Expensive Gaming Pc: 8Pack OrionX

The world’s most expensive gaming pc is the 8Pack OrionX, built in a custom case that costs £20000. It has a liquid-cooled 4-way SLI Nvidia GTX Titan X graphics card and overclocked 6950X Intel processor with Liquid Nitrogen Cooling.

Specifications Of 8Pack OrionX

  • This Most expensive gaming PC is capable of achieving an ultra-high 4K resolution at a maximum of 60fps.
  • Maximum overclock: 5 GHz+
  • CPU: Intel Core i7 6950X overclocked to 5.0GHz, liquid-cooled
  • GPU: 4x Nvidia Titan X Pascal liquid-cooled with backplates and custom heatsinks
  • RAM: 128GB HyperX Predator 3000MHz memory overclocked to 3200MHz
  • PSU: 1000W 80 Plus Platinum power supply from FSP
  • SSD 1: 4x Samsung 960 Pro M.2 NVME SSDs with custom coloring/cooling and each holding a different operating system – 8Pack logo engraved on all of them! One can hold Windows, and two can hold three games each. One has SteamOS preinstalled
  • SSD 2: 1x Samsung 850 Pro dedicated for the OS only
  • HDD 1: 1x Seagate Barracuda HDD with all of 8Pack’s benchmark data stored on it dating back to 2008, which also allows him to run replays of competitions he has won
  • HDD 2: 1x Coolermaster SSD HDD, with 8Packs latest projects stored on it – so he can carry on working from home if need be! This also has a custom-built desk inside the case, which fits in place of the hard drive bracket – so when it’s not being used, you won’t see any screws or anything messy.

Case Of 8Pack OrionX

Unique custom-built case featuring 3x 120mm fans, one on the front with 8Pack logo progress and two at the back.

A further six high-end fans are mounted in parts of the case that aren’t visible but cool critical components such as power supply and graphics cards. Each radiator has its customized cooling loop, and each unit has its pump and reservoir. Finally, there is a LED-lit 8Pack logo inside of the case!

  • Custom LED lighting from Phanteks
  • Custom white sleeved cables from Cablemod
  • A custom water-cooling loop with a D5 pump & reservoir combo from EKWB (as seen in the picture) allows this pc to push up to 3.2 liters of coolant per minute through each of the GPU’s and CPU, respectively! This gives the hardware a longer life as they don’t overheat as fast compared with other less powerful but more expensive gaming PCs, where many pc builders only use a single GPU and a normal air-cooled CPU/cooler.

Why 8Pack OrionX Is World’s Most Expensive Gaming Pc

8Pack OrionX-2

Earlier this week, HEXUS reported on a new entrant into the record books as the most expensive gaming PC ever sold, named the 8Pack OrionX. A detailed analysis of that ‘digital paper trail’ is encapsulated in an earlier article that is worth reading if you aren’t already aware of what makes this PC soo special.

The 8Pack OrionX starts its record-breaking journey with Intel’s latest 9th Gen Core i9-9900K CPU and pairs that with an ASUS ROG Maximus XI Apex motherboard and four Nvidia Titan RTX graphics cards. That selection alone is enough to tell you it will be expensive, but there is more: the 8Pack OrionX ships with 64GB of RAM, all liquid-cooled and with a see-through ‘window’ in the case to let you view the inner beauty.


While other PCs might be slightly more powerful (the CPU has eight cores compared to Intel’s latest i9-9920X – which has twelve cores), it is the 8Pack OrionX’s unique packaging that makes it the most expensive gaming PC available right now.


Many pundits have suggested this is the most expensive gaming PC globally, but digging through the Guinness World Records website didn’t produce any examples of an outright winner. Instead, it revealed that in 2014 there was a contender for ‘most expensive gaming computer’ when Falcon Northwest built a Tiki model with specifications including 2TB Seagate solid-state hybrid drive, 12GB Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan graphics, 2.7GHz Intel Core i7 4820K CPU, and 32GB Crucial DDR3 SDRAM memory.

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One Response

  1. Roger

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